Creative beginnings for tiny tots

Archive for March, 2012

Helping Kids Cope when a Loved One has Cancer

As a fan of quality children’s literature, I want to encourage parents, teachers, and therapists out there who are dealing with this issue to visit Randi Rentz’ “Why Buy A Wig…” blog for a great children’s book recommendation on the subject for kids aged 3 – 10.

Randi is a seasoned special education teacher and consultant, a breast cancer survivor, and a dear friend with a razor sharp wit and excellent taste, so I trust her judgement!

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Everybody needs a hand once in a while…

We were on sick day number 4 over here today, and by this afternoon were hit hard with the boredom and crankiness that always seems to accompany that point in the recuperation when the sick kid has enough energy to be antsy, but still feels lousy enough to be irritable.  Once again, the plaster casting material came to our rescue, when I was certain there would be no redeeming this gloomy afternoon.

I was immediately reminded of a phrase from a workshop I recently attended with Kirk Martin of Celebrate Calm:  “Motion changes emotion.”

In other words, when your child is melting down, get him to a change of scenery, get him involved in doing something, don’t just stand there trying to talk him out of it.

Thankfully, in our case, the plaster material and my son’s earlier projects were still set up on the table on our enclosed porch (a nice sunny spot to work) for him to notice, which eliminated the need for me to suggest he work with the materials (I’m sure he would have said “NO!” to anything I suggested at that point).  He has gone out there twice in the last few days to expand on his previous experiences with hand casting, and has had some fun getting more inventive and expressive!

Based on these recent positive experiences working with this medium, he was able to make the choice on his own to go for it this afternoon.

Within seconds, he shifted from, “I hate you! I hate everything!” to “Mom, stay here and do this with me.”  And his energy immediately shifted from tense and agitated to calm and engaging.  In my previous posts (like this one, and this one, and this one, and this one) I have spoken about the therapeutic impact of the sense of touch that is elicited through various art media.  For my son and me, the process of casting each other’s hands in clay and in plaster, has become a valuable tool.  My nine year old has discovered that he can use this process to bring about a sense of calm for himself, and it is also something that he can control and use to create a concrete and predictable outcome, which gives him a feeling of mastery and success.  It is also a wonderful way for the two of us to connect.

And today, he took the process a step further with a new idea he came up with for decorating the extra thick cast that we had built around his hand.  He used pipettes to squirt liquid watercolors on the cast, creating a colorful splattered effect.  What a turnaround from gloom and doom to bright and fun and whimsical.

You don’t have to have complicated art materials at your disposal to apply these principals in your own home.  Think about what hooks your child.  It could be anything from building with legos, to playing with playdough, to tossing bean bags, to whipping up a recipe in the kitchen…anything that gets them moving and doing and using their senses while connecting with you in a relaxed and fun way.  Over time these experiences help them learn that they can make choices to help calm themselves and learn self-control.

“Beautiful hands!”

Remember our friend who was hesitant to get the messy paint on her hands due to sensory issues, but had a breakthrough when we did our monoprinting activity two weeks ago?

Well, look at her now…

She spent most of the class time delighting in this new sensation, all the while repeating the words, “Beautiful hands” as both affirmation and reassurance that all was well.

All that positive self-talk must have done the trick because before long she had moved on to the tactics of my most hard-core finger painters…the squeezing of the paint-soaked spongy balls (golf-ball shaped cat toys, actually, which I highly recommend as painting tools).  To this, she adopted the mantra, “Squeeze!  Squeeze!”

Gratifying all around!

Wordless Wednesday

Inspired by the paintings in this lovely wordless picture book:

the artwork that ensued needs no words…

Gallery

Simple Words of Wisdom

…for anyone who knows, loves, teaches, cares for, or spends time with young children.  Compliments of Explorations Early Learning LLC, which I stumbled upon on Facebook.

Four Variations on a Theme

Oil pastel/fabric collage/sticker art completed by four children ranging in age from 2 – 3 1/2 years, reflecting their varying developmental levels and unique personal styles, and inspired by Kimberly Knutson’s Bed Bouncers

I’ve gotta HAND it to him…

…the kid knows what he needs to turn a blah afternoon into a great one.

After last weekend’s satisfying foray with clay, this weekend, my nine year old requested another sculptural medium that I just happened to have on hand as well…an industrial sized roll of plaster wrap cloth (like they used to use for plaster casts when you broke a bone in the old days, when I was a kid).

He independently set about cutting the plaster wrap into one-inch strips, then decided he wanted to wrap a clay bowl that we made last weekend with it.  He thoroughly enjoyed the process of dipping the strips in water and smoothing them around the solid piece of clay.

Next, he surprised me by asking to make a cast of MY hand.  In my many years as an art therapist, I spent many a session painstakingly and gingerly applying these plaster strips to my students, most often creating face masks, occasionally covering their hands in various positions.  It was always considered a great moment in the therapeutic relationship, when a client felt safe and trusting enough to allow for this kind of interaction.  And for some of the kids with whom I worked who had experienced all kinds of deprivation or abuse, this kind of nurturing, gentle attention filled a very basic need.  After all those years as a therapist, and now all my years as a mom, it was novel and welcome to be on the receiving end of this process!

For just a little while, my boy was in charge and in control, but at the same time so gentle and careful as he meticulously (and I should mention that meticulous is not a word I would use to describe his approach to most tasks) formed the strips of plaster around my hand.  I felt taken care of, kind of like having a spa treatment, and was delighted that he was intent on adding several layers to make sure it was nice and sturdy.

Feeling full mastery over this process now, he then embarked on his final project for the day, a cast of his own foot.  Without any supervision from me (I went in the house to clean up), he completed this piece from start to finish and was thoroughly impressed with the results.  He added, “It felt warm and cold and soooo soothing.”  I hope that in the near future he will let me make a mask of his face…or perhaps he’ll offer to make a mask of mine!

I wonder if he’ll be interested in decorating these….with paint, collage, or by gluing other objects or materials to them.  For now, his interest seems to be more in the process of building the casts themselves, whether from clay or plaster, than in turning them into something decorative or expressive.  I believe he engages in these types of projects to fulfill a sensory need.

He has always been a sensory guy.  See?