Creative beginnings for tiny tots

Posts tagged ‘connections’

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Big Shoes to Fill

Today was the first meeting of our fall class for preschoolers. It was wonderful to have a small group of kids who have been coming to the same class together for about a year now. When I realized this was a “seasoned” group, I decided to change the plan for the class at the last minute from free-form painting and a simple shoe tracing (we read a rollicking version of Pete the Cat: I Love My White Shoes just to get everyone warmed up), to a more focused exercise in observational drawing.

I think the children and their grown-ups were pleased with what they accomplished today!

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Steppin’ into summer

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I hate to say it, but “Step aside, Suess! There’s a new cat in town, and instead of a hat, he’s wearin’ SHOES!”

Can’t think of a better way to kick off our summer session than with a romping rendition of Eric Litwin’s Pete the Cat.

After singin’ along with Pete, everyone got to show off their own shoes (great way to reinforce color identification, as each child shared the color of his or her shoes). Then, with help from the grown-ups as needed, each child traced and decorated his shoes and cut them out.

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Then came the REAL fun…painting the piles of colors to “step” in!

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Last, the kiddos placed their shoes in the colorful splashes, swirls, and piles of paint.

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And what would an art class for tots and preschoolers be without at least one renegade who shunned the shoes altogether to do her own thing?

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Like Pete the Cat says, “It’s ALL GOOD!” I like his CAT-titude!

We survived Sandy and so did “Leaf Man”!

The wind and rain swept through, but we were pretty lucky here in Northern Virginia, near Washington, DC.  No significant damage, and we were able to resume our regularly scheduled activities today.  Best of all, there were still plenty of colorful autumn leaves to be found, so my little friends were able to do some collecting on their way to class in anticipation of our Leaf Man inspired projects.

And inspired, they were.

I just love when our real life experiences, our stories, and our art all intersect.  This happens naturally, when we focus on the natural world around us!

See for yourself…

Getting to know the materials is a good portion of the fun, and an important part of the “work” to be done:

And there is great satisfaction to be had from squeezing and pouring one’s own glue (while building those hand muscles to be used for fine motor skills down the road):

With nature providing the materials, an artful adventure is inevitable ~

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“A leaf man’s got to go where the wind blows…”

Truer words were never spoken here on the east coast today, as we brace for the worst of Hurricane Sandy, yet to come.  The rain has been coming down steadily, the wind is picking up, and all the schools and government offices are closed.  So much for our autumn project planned for the first half of this week, collages made from real leaves, inspired by Lois Ehlert’s Leaf Man.

Since I may not have the opportunity to blog about this project after all (the leaf piles and the leaf men hidden therein may all have blown away by the time all is said and done), I’m going to link you to an interview I did with one of my favorite bloggers, Jean Van’t Hul of The Artful Parent, so you can get to know a bit more about my background, the origins and philosophy of the ART IN HAND program, and art therapy in general.  Here’s hoping we all get to keep our power on!  (realistically speaking, that’s fairly unlikely in these parts in the next day or so…)

Happy reading!

Julie Liddle:  An Art Therapist’s Perspective

A Leaf Can Be…

First we explored real leaves, which are all around us this time of year, and talked about some of the things a leaf can be…

Red, yellow, orange, brown, green, speckled, multi-colored, pointy, round, heart-shaped, crunchy, floppy…the list goes on.  What a great opportunity for reinforcing concepts of color and shape and for vocabulary-building in general.

Then we read this lovely new book I discovered by Laura Purdie Salas, which desribes with gentle rhymes and watercolor illustrations by Violeta Dabija, some of the more obscure things that leaves can be…

“A tree topper, a rain stopper…A shade spiller, a mouth filler…a skin welter, a bat shelter…”

Then, with markers and oil pastels in hand, the kiddos had a go at designing their own leaves.  They marked their  various leaf-shaped papers (pre-cut by me out of coffee filters) with spots, scribbles and lines of all kinds and colors, and then witnessed the magic when liquid watercolors were painted on top of their marks.  The marker designs, being water-based, spread and bled and changed, while the oil pastel designs remained intact as they resisted the water-based paint.  In some classes, we even sprinkled salt on our painted leaves, a fun sensory experience which added another stunning element to the visual outcome of the paintings (note the speckling that occurs on these paintings).  I especially love the independent mindedness of two year olds given the opportunity to control their own outcomes with materials, as illustrated by the artists who chose to add additional drawings and real leaves to their final collage, and the young man who proved that a  leaf can even be…BLUE!

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Nuts to you!

If you’ve spent any time with us at all, you know by now that we love an opportunity to integrate real happenings and materials from nature, with the stories and art-making that we experience in class.  There is no shortage of opportunities to do just that, this time of year.

Thanks to Lois Ehlert, one of my all-time favorite children’s book authors and illustrators, we went “nuts” this week:

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Check out Nuts To You by Lois Ehlert, when you have a chance.  Her collages will wow you almost as much as ours just did!

Mixed media madness makes my day

Stressful summer punctuated by uplifting moments with creative kiddos making magic with simple materials.

 

 

Lois Ehlert’s Color Zoo provided inspiration for these creations emphasizing color and shape.