Creative beginnings for tiny tots

Posts tagged ‘tempera paints’

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Steppin’ into summer

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I hate to say it, but “Step aside, Suess! There’s a new cat in town, and instead of a hat, he’s wearin’ SHOES!”

Can’t think of a better way to kick off our summer session than with a romping rendition of Eric Litwin’s Pete the Cat.

After singin’ along with Pete, everyone got to show off their own shoes (great way to reinforce color identification, as each child shared the color of his or her shoes). Then, with help from the grown-ups as needed, each child traced and decorated his shoes and cut them out.

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Then came the REAL fun…painting the piles of colors to “step” in!

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Last, the kiddos placed their shoes in the colorful splashes, swirls, and piles of paint.

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And what would an art class for tots and preschoolers be without at least one renegade who shunned the shoes altogether to do her own thing?

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Like Pete the Cat says, “It’s ALL GOOD!” I like his CAT-titude!

The Art of Springtime

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April hath put a spirit of youth in everything. (Sonnet XCVIII)”
― William Shakespeare

Nature is often the backdrop and the inspiration for what we do at ART IN HAND. The emergence of spring always fills me with feelings of exuberant awe and wonder coupled with a calm reassurance that the joy her warmth and beauty brings each year can always be relied upon.

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Young children respond similarly to the cues of spring, and these projects celebrating the signs of birth, rejuvenation, and the delicate beauty of nature’s creations are among my favorites.

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Our students, ages 1.5 – 4, had fun collecting soft things to build cozy nests (and squeezing and pouring their own glue in the process). Then they experimented with feathers as tools for painting on various surfaces, creating delicate brush strokes quite different from those created with a standard paintbrush.

For more artful inspiration from nature and ideas for more springtime art explorations with your kids, I invite you to read my article originally published in Washington Parent Magazine in April 2008.

ArtofSpringtimeApr08

The Pure Pleasure of Paint

I cannot find the words to do justice to these images, so I give you simply that, the images to savor.

We made today a “Market Day”

Once again, children’s author and illustrator extraordinaire, Lois Ehlert, provided the inspiration for our classes this week.  The colorful folk art images and farmers market theme was a great springboard for lots of engaging imaginative play, role playing and
art-making with mass appeal (with built in cognitive and fine motor skill-building)!

As you can see, we prepared for our market day by making our own shopping bags and decorating a bit of spending money.  The kiddos reveled in the simple task of drawing on brown paper bags and blank paper money.  It’s always good to remember how a commonplace activity like drawing takes on a whole new level of interest when we introduce a bit of variation (paper bags instead of plain paper, for example).  Then I threw in a few basic stickers from the office supply store, and they could have “stuck” with this task for hours.  Anything that gives them the chance to use “real” supplies (office labels, money) and skills (pretending to write) that they associate with grown-ups is sure to be a hit, because we all know that at this age, they are little immitators, highly motivated by tasks that allow them to pretend to be like their parents or other admired adult figures in their world.  Plus, all this “practice” writing and sticking and unsticking of stickers is a great workout for those little fingers that will be doing “real” writing just down the road.

After we had our supplies ready (and believe me, we could have spent the whole class time just on this), the kids went shopping at our makeshift market.  They each counted (with help, as needed) three items to place in their bags.  Then they could use their play money to make their purchases, although I wasn’t too strict about this, since some became very attached to their money which had become works of art in their own right.

Before (most of the kiddos) settled in to start snacking on their “purchases”, I showed them how their fruits and veggies made excellent painting tools.  In the past, I have always used large stamp pads soaked with washable liquid watercolors for this activity.  The results are beautifully detailed prints.  This week, however, I mistakenly misplaced my stamp pads, so in a moment of semi-panic, decided to try an alternate version of this activity, simply dipping the cut produce directly into shallow pans filled with washable temperas.  The kids responded so well, I decided to stick with this version in the rest of my classes.

They caught on quickly…

For many, the tactile experience of paint on fruit and paint on hands was a wide open invitation to dive right in to a full blown finger painting extravaganza.

The colors, shapes, and textures that emerged in their paintings were often messy, sometimes beautiful, and truly unique.  Those are three of my favorite ingredients for what I would deem a successful art experience!

Have You Seen Trees?

This lovely book written by Joanne Oppenheim and illustrated by Jean and Mou-Sien Tseng

inspired life-sized art, as we posed like trees and got to stretch our limbs as we drew and painted on large paper posted on the wall.  Working large, on a vertical surface, makes the act of drawing and painting very much a gross motor (rather than fine motor) activity.  The arms move from the shoulder down to the hand, and the entire trunk is engaged for balance as children paint in a standing or squatting position.

Have you seen trees?  High trees, wide trees, reaching-to-the-sky trees….

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The Art of Springtime

As we kick off another spring session, I wanted to share with you all an article I wrote for Washington Parent magazine a few years back.  I hope it inspires you to make the most of the creative possibilities that surround your wherever you are.

Washington Parent: The Art of Springtime

“Beautiful hands!”

Remember our friend who was hesitant to get the messy paint on her hands due to sensory issues, but had a breakthrough when we did our monoprinting activity two weeks ago?

Well, look at her now…

She spent most of the class time delighting in this new sensation, all the while repeating the words, “Beautiful hands” as both affirmation and reassurance that all was well.

All that positive self-talk must have done the trick because before long she had moved on to the tactics of my most hard-core finger painters…the squeezing of the paint-soaked spongy balls (golf-ball shaped cat toys, actually, which I highly recommend as painting tools).  To this, she adopted the mantra, “Squeeze!  Squeeze!”

Gratifying all around!